2009-2010 Honda CRF450r – Rear Shock Rebuild

How To Rebuild The Rear Shock Absorber On Your 2009 – 2010 Honda CRF450R

The Tools2009-2010 Honda CRF450r - Rear Shock Rebuild You Will Need To Service Your Shock Are:

  • Bladder Removal Tool
  • Seal Bullet
  • Seal Head Setting Tool
  • Schrader Valve Core Tool
  • Punch
  • Mallet
  • 17mm Wrench
  • 17mm Socket
  • 15/16th Wrench
  • 15/16th Crow’s Foot Extension
  • Flat Head Screwdrivers
  • Bench Vise
  • Flat file
  • Triangle file
  • Heat gun
  • Towels
  • Parts Cleaner
  • Safety Glasses

Shock Service Parts:

You will need to replace every wearable part of your shock absorber, including but not limited too:

  • Seal Head
  • Reservoir Bladder
  • Valve Bushing
  • Valve O-Rings
  • Compression Adjuster O-Rings
  • Bump Stop

Fortunately, you can get all these parts in a rebuild kit through our partner’s links!

Shock Body Disassembly:

Place you shock upside down in your vice and loosen the spring adjuster lock nut.

1 - Loosen Spring Lock Nut
1 – Loosen Spring Lock Nut

Back the spring adjustment nut out, and remove the spring seat assembly and spring.

2 - Loosen Spring Adjustment Nut
2 – Loosen Spring Adjustment Nut

Completely back out the rebound, high-speed compression, and low-speed compression adjusters.

3 - Back Out High Speed Compression Adjuster
3 – Back Out High-Speed Compression Adjuster
4 - Back Out High Rebound Adjuster
4 – Back Out High Rebound Adjuster
5 - Back Out Slow Speed Compression Adjuster
5 – Back Out Slow Speed Compression Adjuster

Bleed the reservoir bladder, and remove the reservoir valve core.

6 - Bleed Reservoir
6 – Bleed Reservoir
7 - Remove Reservoir Valve Core
7 – Remove Reservoir Valve Core

Remove the compression adjuster from the shock body.

8 - Loosen Compression Adjuster
8 – Loosen Compression Adjuster
9 - Remove Compression Adjuster
9 – Remove Compression Adjuster
10 - Remove Compression Adjuster Core With Screwdrivers
10 – Remove Compression Adjuster Core With Screwdrivers
11 - Compression Adjuster Core
11 – Compression Adjuster Core

The compression adjuster core may be stuck in the shock body. If it is, finish disassembling the shock, then gently use two screwdrivers pushing in a back and forth motion until it works itself out.

Related: 2009-2010 Honda CRF450R – Front Fork Rebuild

Pump your shock several times to drain the old oil from the compression adjuster hole.

12 - Pump Shock To Remove Oil
12 – Pump Shock To Remove Oil

Attach your reservoir cap puller to the bladder valve and drive the cap into the body just far enough to access the circlip.

13 - Install Reservoir Cap Removal Tool
13 – Install Reservoir Cap Removal Tool

Remove the circlip with a combination of screwdrivers, pick, and patience. Be very careful not to scratch the reservoir wall.

14 - Remove Reservoir Cap Retainer Circlip
14 – Remove Reservoir Cap Retainer Circlip

Reattach your reservoir cap puller and remove the bladder from the reservoir.

15 - Remove Shock Reservoir
15 – Remove Shock Reservoir

Locate the two punch holes on the end plate, and using your punch and mallet, remove the plate.

16 - Remove End Cap
16 – Remove End Cap

Secure the bumper seat, bumper, and shock stopper cap to the end of the shaft.

17 - Secure Bumper Stop Bumper And End Plate To End Of Shaft
17 – Secure Bumper Stop Bumper And End Plate To End Of Shaft

Place your head setting tool and drive the seal head into the shock body far enough to access the retainer circlip.

18 - Set Seal Head Setting Tool
18 – Set Seal Head Setting Tool

Remove the circlip with screwdrivers or a pick, taking care not to scratch the bore.

19 - Remove Seal Head Retainer Circlip
19 – Remove Seal Head Retainer Circlip

Clean the seal head, and smooth down any scratches or burs. The bore must be smooth to remove the shaft.

Aggressively remove the shaft from the shock body.

20 - Remove Shock Shaft From Body
20 – Remove Shock Shaft From Body
21 - Shock Shaft Out Of Body
21 – Shock Shaft Out Of Body

New Parts:

As always, check your new parts before you remove the old ones.

I am using a pivot works rebuild kit, but I’m less than impressed with it.

It replaces the stock rubber bumper with a polyurethane one, the reservoir bladder does not match the stock size, this kit does NOT include new o-rings for the compression adjuster, and the piston bushing is one solid piece.

22 - Fancy New Parts
22 – Fancy New Parts

The solid bushing does match the stock one, but you need an installation kit, which most DIY guys, including myself, do not have.

You can install the bushing without the kit, but you need to be careful, and I’ll show you how later on.

Even with missing and mismatched parts, this rebuild does offer high-quality components.

(You can get your rebuild kit RockyMountainATVMC)

Related: 2009-2010 Honda CRF450r – Bleeding Brake System

Shock Shaft Service:

Remove the piston bushing and o-rings.

23 - Remove Old Valve Bushing
23 – Remove Old Valve Bushing
24 - Remove Valve O-Rings
24 – Remove Valve O-Rings

The shock nut needs to be secured to the shaft to make sure it stays put.  If your shock has been previously rebuilt, you will see punch marks where the nut meets the shaft.

This shock has never been rebuilt, so the shaft end still mushrooms over the nut.

In either case, you will need to wrap your piston in a shop towel and evenly file down the end of the shaft to free the nut.

25 - File Shaft End To Free Nut
25 – File Shaft End To Free Nut

Remove the nut, and transfer the shim stack and valve to a long screwdriver.

26 - Remove Shaft Nut
26 – Remove Shaft Nut
27 - Transfer Shims And Valve To Screwdriver
27 – Transfer Shims And Valve To Screwdriver

Clean & Inspect:

Clean the shaft components and shock body with parts cleaner.

28 - Clean Everything!
28 – Clean Everything!

Carefully separate and clean the shim stack, making sure to keep everything in order.

If you lose track of your shim orientation, build the stack from largest to smallest, with the broadest end starting at the valve.

29 - Clean Shim Stack
29 – Clean Shim Stack

This rebuild kit does not include o-rings for the compression adjuster. These parts are in good shape, so I am going to reuse them. So to clean the compression adjuster, I am going to wipe it down with a clean cloth and just a tiny bit of alcohol.

Dry your parts with compressed air, then inspect each component for excessive wear or damage.

You will need to true the threads on the shock shaft.

30 - Correct Shaft Threads With Triangle File
30 – Correct Shaft Threads With Triangle File

You can correct the threads using your triangle file. The old nut will be damaged, so use the new nut check your work.

Shock Shaft Assembly:

Install your seal bullet over the shaft threads, followed by the bumper plate, bumper, and end plate.

31 - Install Seal Bullet
31 – Install Seal Bullet

Lubricate the new seal head with shock oil, and carefully install it onto the shaft.

32 - Install Seal Head
32 – Install Seal Head

Transfer your shim and valve stack to the shaft, install the nut hand tight, and install the two o-rings.

33 - Install Shims And Valve
33 – Install Shims And Valve
34 - Install New Valve O-Rings
34 – Install New Valve O-Rings

Remove the nut, transfer the first shim stack back to your screwdriver, then replace the nut.

Bushing Install:

Here is where you need a lot of patience when installing the one piece bushing.

The proper way to install this bushing is using an install kit that slowly stretches the bushing over a cone, then onto the valve.

The problem with this is the kit costs a lot, and isn’t even available in the US, so you need to add international shipping and a few weeks of waiting.

To add to the fun, you cannot pry the bushing onto the valve with screwdrivers without tearing the bushing or damaging the valve.

I find the safest and free-est way to install the bushing is to heat it with a heat gun, then slowly stretch it with my fingers.

35 - Heat New Valve Bushings
35 – Heat New Valve Bushings

The trick is to heat the bushing enough to be pliable, but not so much it burns your fingers.

36 - Install Valve Bushing
36 – Install Valve Bushing

After you install the bushing, immediately wrap your valve with electrical tape as tight as you can, then put the valve in the freezer for a few hours to let it contract.

37 - Tape Valve Bushing
37 – Tape Valve Bushing
Shock Body Assembly:

Oil the bladder lip, then connect it to the cap. Oil the outside of the bladder and install it into the reservoir past the circlip groove.

38 - Oil Reservoir Bladder
38 – Oil Reservoir Bladder
39 - Install Reservoir
39 – Install Reservoir

Install the circlip, followed by the valve core.

40 - Install Reservoir Circlip
40 – Install Reservoir Circlip

Inflate the bladder about seven psi to seat in against the retainer circlip.

41 - Seat Reservoir Cap
41 – Seat Reservoir Cap

Take your shock valve directly from the freezer to the shock shaft.

42 - Install Valve
42 – Install Valve

Transfer the shim stack to the shaft, and install the nut.

43 - Transfer Shims To Shock Shaft
43 – Transfer Shims To Shock Shaft
44 - Tighten Shock Shaft Nut
44 – Tighten Shock Shaft Nut

Torque the shaft nut to 19 ft-lbs.

45 - Torque Shock Shaft To 19 Ft-lbs
45 – Torque Shock Shaft To 19 Ft-lbs

Secure the nut to the shaft using your punch and a hammer, setting 3 to 4 stakes equally around the shaft end.

46 - Stake Nut To Shaft
46 – Stake Nut To Shaft

Oil the shock shaft bore and piston, and install the shock shaft into the shock body.

47 - Install Shaft Into Shock Body
47 – Install Shaft Into Shock Body

Install the seal head, followed by the retainer circlip.

48 - Install Shaft Retainer Circlip
48 – Install Shaft Retainer Circlip

Set the end plate with your mallet.

49 - Install End Plate
49 – Install End Plate

Fresh Oil:

Position your shock, so the compression adjuster hole is parallel to your work surface.

Slowly fill the shock with oil.

50 - Fill Body With Shock Oil
50 – Fill Body With Shock Oil

As you go, slowly work the shaft in and out to help free any trapped air, and continue to fill and pump until no bubbles can be seen.

But be careful, or you will make a mess.

With the body filled, remove your shock from your vice and tilt it back and forth to work oil into the reservoir.

51 - Fill Reservoir With Shock Oil
51 – Fill Reservoir With Shock Oil

Top off the oil level as you go.

Coat the compression adjuster in shock oil and install it into the body.

The compression adjuster will displace some oil, so be ready with a towel.

52 - Install Compression Adjuster
52 – Install Compression Adjuster

Tighten the compression adjuster, then torque to 22 ft-lbs.

53 - Tighten Compression Adjuster
53 – Tighten Compression Adjuster
54 - Torque Compression Adjuster To 22 ft-lbs
54 – Torque Compression Adjuster To 22 ft-lbs

You will not be able to fit a socket over the compression adjuster, so you will need to use a crows foot extension on your torque wrench.

Make sure to keep the crow’s foot extension at a 90-degree angle to your wrench.

Testing:

To make sure your rebuild was successful, fill the reservoir with as much air as you can, but no more than 145 psi.

55 - Test Your Rebuild
55 – Test Your Rebuild

Work your shaft in and out a few times, then let your shock sit for a few hours.

If nothing is leaking from the seal head, reservoir cap or compression adjuster you are good to go, and you can bleed the reservoir.

Most powersports shops can refill your shock with nitrogen for cheap.

Stock Pressure Is 145 PSI

If you have any questions about this shock rebuild, please let me know in the comments or on social.

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